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At the end of the war Eckert rejoined Columbia as the founder and director of IBM Watson Scientific Computing Laboratory on 116th Street, IBM's first pure research facility, which also served as Columbia's "computer center," and created the world's first Computer Science curriculum.In 1963 Columbia opened its own Computer Center on campus underneath the Business School.From 1963 to 1975 all computing at was done on large central IBM mainframes, with a handful of smaller computers in the departments.

New: Books, manuals, journals, magazines, notes, and artifacts... Last update: Fri Sep 16 2016 Adapted for mobile devices 4 April 2015.

[ Credits ] [ Introduction ] [ Timeline ] [ Epilog ] [ Tables ] [ Acronyms ] [ Glossary ] [ Sources ] [ Links ] [ FAQ ] [ The Columbia Difference Calculator ] [ The Superbrain ] [ Books, Manuals, etc ] [ DEC VAXmate ] [ USSR Photo Album 1989 ] [ Terminal and Plotter User Manual ] [ IBM 031 ] [ Wallace Eckert ] [ Watson Lab #1 ] [ Herb Grosch ] [ Pupin Hall ] [ IBM NORC ] [ DEC PDP-7 ] [ IBM Type 012 Key Punch ] [ IBM Key Punches ] [ IBM 701 ] [ IBM 1401 ] [ The Columbia Astronomical Computing Bureau ] [ The Columbia Difference Calculator ] [ The Columbia Statistical Bureau ] [ The First "PC" ] [ DECmate ] [ Rolm ] [ The Parnassus Club ] [ IBM 609 ] [ Air Almanac ] [ Naval Observatory ] [ Kleine Planeten ] [ Paul Herget ] [ Table Printer ] [ IBM 1130 ] [ Films ] [ IBM 026 Card Punch ] [ IBM 029 Card Punch ] [ Watson Lab Gallery ] [ IBM CPC ] [ IBM 602 ] [ IBM 604 ] [ IBM 650 ] [ Aberdeen Relay Calculator ] [ MNRAS Plate Scans 1928-32 ] [ The 1935 Baehne Book ] [ IBM 603 ] [ IBM 607 ] [ ENIAC ] [ Brunsviga Calculator ] [ Elliott Frank Recollections ] [ Jacquard Loom ] [ CU 1926 ] [ Old IBM Key Punches ] [ CU Punch Card ] [ IBM SSEC ] [ 1965 Gallery ] [ IBM 7094 ] [ IBM 1403 ] [ IBM 360/91 ] [ IBM Data Cell ] [ IBM MSS ] [ 1968 Student Uprising ] [ Teletypes ] [ DEC PDP-11 ] [ DEC-20 ] [ SSIO Gallery ] [ Watson Lab #2 ] This document gives a chronology of computing at Columbia University, as best I can piece it together, written mainly in Jan-Feb 2001, updated periodically since then (time of last update listed above).

It does not aspire to be a general history or museum of computing, but in some ways it's not far from one either.

Corrections, additional information, and more photos are always welcome.

If you came here looking for the history of the Kermit protocol, Kermit software, or the Kermit Project, you can find some of it below in the 1980-82 timeframe, and a bit more HERE.

Last modified 09-Feb-2016 07:29